September Shows

Sterling Allen: Backdrop & Blocker
September 22 - October 22, 2017
O'Quinn Gallery
Essay by Betsy Huete

In this solo presentation by Sterling Allen, the Austin-based artist creates a site-specific sculpture-based installation that activates sight lines, architectural relationships, hanging conventions, and spatial connections, all while celebrating pop, the handmade, function, failure and the cheap illusion.

Sterling Allen holds an MFA in Sculpture from the Milton Avery Graduate School of Arts at Bard College and a BFA in Studio Art from the University of Texas in Austin. He is a co-founder and co-director of Okay Mountain, an artist collective and former gallery based in Austin, Texas. As a solo artist and in collaboration with the group, he has exhibited, organized, and completed projects at venues throughout the United States and received several residencies including the Artpace International Artist-In-Residence Program in San Antonio, Texas and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Art in Omaha, Nebraska. He is currently an Assistant Professor in Studio Art at Texas State University in San Marcos, TX.

Backdrop & Blocker (installation view), 2017

Betsy Huete is an artist and writer from Houston. She received her BFA from Rice in 2006 and her MFA in Sculpture from the University of Houston in 2014. Huete has had solo and two-person exhibitions at Art League Houston, Lawndale Art Center, Matchbox Gallery, and galleryHOMELAND, and participated in Houston’s Fringe Festival in 2012. She attended the artist residency Mildred’s Lane during the summers of 2012 and 2013, and was subsequently included in the residency’s exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in the fall of 2012. A frequent contributor to Glasstire, Huete has also written for The Great God Pan is Dead, gulfcoastmag.org, and served as the assistant editor for the Art Lies section of Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts in 2013. Additionally, in 2012 she collaborated on Dis Manibus: A Taxonomy of Ghosts From Popular Forms published by Information as Material in the UK.



Katherine Trimble: Touch Box
September 22 – November 5, 2017
Project Space
Essay by Melissa Warak, Ph.D.

When does a sound become music? When does language break down into sound? What happens to live music if you can't see the performer? Houston-based artist and musician, Katherine Trimble asks her audience to contemplate the breakdown of sounds in an immersive site-specific installation entitled Touch Box.

Katherine Trimble is a Houston-based musician and visual artist. She makes audiovisual installations and performances that explore how our senses influence, contradict, and depend on each other to create our own individual versions of the world. Originally from Rochester, NY, she earned a BFA in Animation from the Rhode Island School of Design (2006) and an MFA in Art & Technology Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2012), and has performed and exhibited her work internationally in a wide range of art spaces, film festivals, music venues and public spaces. She currently teaches at the High School for the Performing and Visual Arts (HSPVA) and Houston Community College.

Touch Box, 2017
Custom room, tactile transducers, microphone, custom software
8.5’ x 6’ x 8.5’ / Dimensions variable

Dr. Melissa Warak is Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Texas at El Paso and specializes in the relationship of music and sound to art of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Dr. Warak is a Houston native and earned a B.A. in English literature and art history from Vanderbilt University, and her M.A. / Ph.D. in art history from the University of Texas at Austin. Her current research focuses on the ways that visual artists from the mid-fifties to late sixties employed musical models in their work. Aside from musical and sound art, her research interests include the history of abstraction, spirituality in modern and contemporary art, science and technology in modern and contemporary art, and astronomy in art. Her research has been supported by grants and fellowships from the National Portrait Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution, the Getty Research Institute, the Royal Music Association of the United Kingdom, The Menil Collection in Houston, the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, the Kress Foundation, and the Yale University Art Galleries, among others.



 

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